Boultenhouse House

Recently we spend a day volunteering for the Tantramar Heritage Trust. Their museum at Boultenhouse House on Queen’s Road in Sackville was beginning to be lost behind the two enormous yews planted at the front corners of the building. Yews are an unusual evergreen in the sense that when branches http://cialis-canada-pharma.com/how-to-use-cialis.html

are cut back hard they will sprout new greenery. This characteristic made serious renovation of these two yews possible. They’re a little thin now, but in a year or so will be full and green and much better proportioned in this setting.

Paul Bogaard, a dedicated enthusiast of both history and horticulture, spruced up the roses and kept us entertained with tales of gardens past. Paul’s ambition is to give the Boutenhouse grounds an authentic 1850s character by choosing plants typical of that time or earlier. The old-fashioned roses

are an example of this. New beds for old plants are being held for planting under a thick blanket of mulch donated for just that purpose.